HomeBusinessApple Supplier Foxconn's Hiring Practices Exclude Married Indian Women At Tamil Nadu...

Apple Supplier Foxconn’s Hiring Practices Exclude Married Indian Women At Tamil Nadu Plant: Report – News18


Reuters reported Foxconn discriminates against married women by rejecting their job applications, because of their greater family responsibilities compared to unmarried counterparts as the reason.

The report revealed that the smartphone manufacturer systematically excluded married women from job opportunities at its main iPhone assembly plant

Foxconn, a key manufacturer of Apple devices, has been excluding married women from assembly jobs at its flagship smartphone plant in India, Reuters reported. This practice contradicts the codes of conduct for both companies, which explicitly prohibit discrimination based on marital status.

A Reuters investigation report published on June 25 revealed that Foxconn discriminates against married women by rejecting their job applications, because of their “greater family responsibilities compared to unmarried counterparts” as the reason.

‘Post-marriage Issues’

The report revealed that the smartphone manufacturer systematically excluded married women from job opportunities at its main iPhone assembly plant in Sriperumbudur, near Chennai, Tamil Nadu. The world’s largest contract electronics maker justified this by claiming that married women have “more issues post-marriage.”

As per the report, this was confirmed by numerous former and current employees from over a dozen Foxconn hiring agencies across India, many of whom spoke to the news agency on the condition of anonymity.

‘Reasons for Discrimination’

Agents and Foxconn HR sources cited family duties, pregnancy, and higher absenteeism as reasons for not hiring married women at the plant. Additionally, many noted that the jewellery worn by married Hindu women could interfere with production.

The ban is not absolute. Three former Foxconn HR executives told Reuters that the Taiwan-headquartered manufacturer is relaxing its policy of not hiring married women during high-production periods when it faces labour shortages. In some cases, hiring agencies assist female candidates in concealing their marital status to secure jobs, Reuters found.

S. Paul, a former human resources executive at Foxconn India, said that the hiring rules were verbally communicated by the company’s executives to its Indian hiring agencies.

“Risk factors increase when you hire married women,” Paul told Reuters.

Foxconn typically avoids hiring married women due to “cultural issues” and societal pressures, explained Paul, who left the company in August 2023 for a higher-paying role at a consulting firm.

Paul added that the company’s view was that there were “many issues post-marriage,” including that women “have babies after marriage.”

In response to inquiries from Reuters, Apple and Foxconn acknowledged shortcomings in their hiring practices in 2022 and stated that they had taken steps to rectify the situation.

However, all the discriminatory practices documented by Reuters at the Sriperumbudur plant occurred in 2023 and 2024. The companies did not address these instances, nor did they specify whether any of the lapses in 2022 involved the hiring of married women.

Ornaments & Concealing Status

Near the Foxconn plant in Sriperumbudur, a road junction just over a mile away serves as a meeting point for recruiters and candidates. Many job seekers travel with their families from remote villages, and if selected, they are expected to begin work promptly.

During the usual hiring season, if a married woman manages to secure an interview, Foxconn officials are vigilant for noticeable metal ornaments, as reported by a current and a former Foxconn HR executive. Those found wearing such ornaments are subsequently turned away, with explanations given that there has been a misunderstanding or that recruitment is currently on hold, according to these individuals.



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